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Home People Cultural Vanguard, Designer and Rye Neighbor Marc Jacobs Profiled in NY Times

Cultural Vanguard, Designer and Rye Neighbor Marc Jacobs Profiled in NY Times

Marc_Jacobs_NYT

Cultural vanguard and still newish Rye resident Marc Jacobs received a big write-up titled The Many Lives of Marc Jacobs in the New York Times this past week. His move to the burbs received note:

(Robert Duffy is Jacobs' former business partner) "“Happiness” was a word that Jacobs’s friends 
and colleagues often used when discussing him. Everyone spoke of how happy he is now, how much easier in his skin. “Sober, settled, happily married,” Duffy said, adding of the designer’s life in Rye: 
“I never in my life thought Marc would be moving 
to the suburbs.” (Jacobs still keeps a Manhattan residence.) The word came up so much that I 
began to feel I was listening to a version of what the 
critic V. S. Pritchett once wrote of the personal 
happiness Edith Wharton found after marriage: “That happiness, it now seems, dulled her talent.” But no. Katie Grand, the house’s stylist since 2013, assured me that the moment Jacobs walks through the door of the seventh-floor studio on Spring Street, “all the Rye-idyllic happiness” falls away and “the anxieties hit, the insecurities hit.” And there are other anxieties, too: about money — Jacobs had recently sold more than 50 works from his personal collection of contemporary art, including one by John Currin and an Andy Warhol, at Sotheby’s — and about age, about the industry’s relentless pursuit of the new. “His creative process hasn’t changed, whether he’s been happy in relationships or unhappy,” said Grand. “His drive is still in his head to go and create something.”"

Read the rest, a great exhaustive piece.

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Marc_Jacobs_NYT

Cultural vanguard and still newish Rye resident Marc Jacobs received a big write-up titled The Many Lives of Marc Jacobs in the New York Times this past week. His move to the burbs received note:

(Robert Duffy is Jacobs' former business partner) "“Happiness” was a word that Jacobs’s friends 
and colleagues often used when discussing him. Everyone spoke of how happy he is now, how much easier in his skin. “Sober, settled, happily married,” Duffy said, adding of the designer’s life in Rye: 
“I never in my life thought Marc would be moving 
to the suburbs.” (Jacobs still keeps a Manhattan residence.) The word came up so much that I 
began to feel I was listening to a version of what the 
critic V. S. Pritchett once wrote of the personal 
happiness Edith Wharton found after marriage: “That happiness, it now seems, dulled her talent.” But no. Katie Grand, the house’s stylist since 2013, assured me that the moment Jacobs walks through the door of the seventh-floor studio on Spring Street, “all the Rye-idyllic happiness” falls away and “the anxieties hit, the insecurities hit.” And there are other anxieties, too: about money — Jacobs had recently sold more than 50 works from his personal collection of contemporary art, including one by John Currin and an Andy Warhol, at Sotheby’s — and about age, about the industry’s relentless pursuit of the new. “His creative process hasn’t changed, whether he’s been happy in relationships or unhappy,” said Grand. “His drive is still in his head to go and create something.”"

Read the rest, a great exhaustive piece.